Idle Nutt

Posts tagged trees

Road trip.  Florida?  Georgia?  Who knows. 

iPhone 4S, Snapseed

Road trip. Florida? Georgia? Who knows.

iPhone 4S, Snapseed


lickystickypickywe:

Artist Giuseppe Penone carefully removes the rings of growth to reveal the ‘sapling within’. By carving out the inside of a tree trunk and leaving the knots in place, they eventually emerge as tiny limbs.

Artist Bryan Nash Gill makes ink prints using rescued wood.  He has a book titled Woodcut that showcases these prints. 
WSJ:
Red Ash Heartwood. The heartwood is the central nonliving part of the trunk with the densest and hardest wood. This is a full bleed print of the center of the Ash block–the annual ringed radiate form the tree’s first year at the center to the edges of the paper.
(via WSJ)

Artist Bryan Nash Gill makes ink prints using rescued wood.  He has a book titled Woodcut that showcases these prints. 

WSJ:

Red Ash Heartwood. The heartwood is the central nonliving part of the trunk with the densest and hardest wood. This is a full bleed print of the center of the Ash block–the annual ringed radiate form the tree’s first year at the center to the edges of the paper.

(via WSJ)

Source The Wall Street Journal


Artist Bryan Nash Gill makes ink prints using rescued wood.  He has a book titled Woodcut that showcases these prints. 
This print is from a locust tree.  You can see the beginning of a branch on the right.
(via WSJ)

Artist Bryan Nash Gill makes ink prints using rescued wood.  He has a book titled Woodcut that showcases these prints. 

This print is from a locust tree.  You can see the beginning of a branch on the right.

(via WSJ)

Source The Wall Street Journal


At a park in NJ. 

iPhone 4S, Snapseed

At a park in NJ.

iPhone 4S, Snapseed


At a park in NJ. 

iPhone 4S, Snapseed

At a park in NJ.

iPhone 4S, Snapseed


If you ever wanted to figure out the height of a tree, there are several ways to go about it.  Click through to see all of them.
I like the method below because look at the perfect application of isosceles and similar triangles!
Lifehacker:

Find a stick the length of your arm. Hold your arm out straight with the stick pointing straight up (90-degree angle to your outstretched arm). Walk backwards until you see the tip of the stick line up with the top of the tree. Your feet are now at approximately the same distance from the tree as it is high (provided the tree is significantly taller than you are, and the ground is relatively level). Old logger method. Simple.
— Answered by shirlock homes

(via Is There an Easy Way to Measure the Height of a Tree? | Lifehacker)

If you ever wanted to figure out the height of a tree, there are several ways to go about it.  Click through to see all of them.

I like the method below because look at the perfect application of isosceles and similar triangles!

Lifehacker:

Find a stick the length of your arm. Hold your arm out straight with the stick pointing straight up (90-degree angle to your outstretched arm). Walk backwards until you see the tip of the stick line up with the top of the tree. Your feet are now at approximately the same distance from the tree as it is high (provided the tree is significantly taller than you are, and the ground is relatively level). Old logger method. Simple.

— Answered by shirlock homes

(via Is There an Easy Way to Measure the Height of a Tree? | Lifehacker)

Source Lifehacker


photo credit:  Trey Ratcliff
Trey Ratcliff:
Here is another photo from our recent Yosemite PhotoWalk last week. The valley floor is full of dense forests that can go on for an eternity.
(via Stuck in Customs)

photo credit:  Trey Ratcliff

Trey Ratcliff:

Here is another photo from our recent Yosemite PhotoWalk last week. The valley floor is full of dense forests that can go on for an eternity.

(via Stuck in Customs)

Source stuckincustoms.com


The Atlantic:
An aerial view of treetops and their reflections in a flooded area in Pathum Thani province, on the outskirts of Bangkok, on October 14, 2011.
photo credit:  Chaiwat Subprasom / Reuters
(via Bangkok Underwater | The Atlantic)

The Atlantic:

An aerial view of treetops and their reflections in a flooded area in Pathum Thani province, on the outskirts of Bangkok, on October 14, 2011.

photo credit:  Chaiwat Subprasom / Reuters

(via Bangkok Underwater | The Atlantic)

Source The Atlantic


designboom:
stockholm-based visiondivision conducted a week-long workshop at the politecnico di milano, in milan, italy, in which guest professors conducted an exploration for students to consider the impact of the fast-paced lifestyle on ecology and environmental issues in architecture. the result was ‘the patient gardener’, a structure consisting of ten japanese cherry trees which is the main building material for the construction of a two-story retreat. bending, twisting, pruning and grafting will be used to control and develop the growth of the building over time. …the final result can be enjoyed on the campus within 80 years.
(via visiondivision: the patient gardener)

designboom:

stockholm-based visiondivision conducted a week-long workshop at the politecnico di milano, in milan, italy, in which guest professors conducted an exploration for students to consider the impact of the fast-paced lifestyle on ecology and environmental issues in architecture. the result was ‘the patient gardener’, a structure consisting of ten japanese cherry trees which is the main building material for the construction of a two-story retreat. bending, twisting, pruning and grafting will be used to control and develop the growth of the building over time. …the final result can be enjoyed on the campus within 80 years.

(via visiondivision: the patient gardener)

Source designboom.com


Futility Closet:
Outside the village of Nowe Czarnowo in western Poland is a grove of 400 pine trees bent into curious crooked shapes. The surrounding trees are straight, but these were apparently deliberately bent north at their bases about 10 years after their planting in 1930. No one knows why.
photo credit:  Wikipedia Commons
(via The Crooked Forest | Futility Closet)

Futility Closet:

Outside the village of Nowe Czarnowo in western Poland is a grove of 400 pine trees bent into curious crooked shapes. The surrounding trees are straight, but these were apparently deliberately bent north at their bases about 10 years after their planting in 1930. No one knows why.

photo credit:  Wikipedia Commons

(via The Crooked Forest | Futility Closet)

Source futilitycloset.com


"Pine Man" by Joseph Wheelwright
photo credit: Margaret Fox
NYTimes.com:
The monumental works in “Joseph Wheelwright: Tree Figures,” from 16 ½ to 27 feet tall, began life upside down as live trees rooted in the soil on the artist’s 40-acre property in East Corinth, Vt.
(via Joseph Wheelwright’s Humanoid Flora on Display in Katonah | NYTimes.com)

"Pine Man" by Joseph Wheelwright

photo credit: Margaret Fox

NYTimes.com:

The monumental works in “Joseph Wheelwright: Tree Figures,” from 16 ½ to 27 feet tall, began life upside down as live trees rooted in the soil on the artist’s 40-acre property in East Corinth, Vt.

(via Joseph Wheelwright’s Humanoid Flora on Display in Katonah | NYTimes.com)

Source The New York Times


Baubotanical building designed by architects at the University of Stuttgart in Germany
The tower is made out of living trees.  Hundreds of White Willow plants will eventually fuse together to form a huge single tree.
(via Inhabitat)

Baubotanical building designed by architects at the University of Stuttgart in Germany

The tower is made out of living trees.  Hundreds of White Willow plants will eventually fuse together to form a huge single tree.

(via Inhabitat)

Source inhabitat.com


There’s this really cool fold-out photo in the October 2009 issue of National Geographic that shows people scaling a HUGE redwood tree.  It’s an awesome photo that’s technically difficult to achieve.  They have a video showing how they did it.
National Geographic:

An old-growth redwood dwarfs younger redwood growth in California’s Bear Creek Watershed on the northwest side of Bear Creek Ridge. Peavine Ridge sits in the distance in Rockefeller Forest, the world’s largest continuous old-growth redwood forest, measuring more than 10,000 acres.

Photo by Michael Nichols.  Click pic to see more photos in this series.

There’s this really cool fold-out photo in the October 2009 issue of National Geographic that shows people scaling a HUGE redwood tree.  It’s an awesome photo that’s technically difficult to achieve.  They have a video showing how they did it.

National Geographic:

An old-growth redwood dwarfs younger redwood growth in California’s Bear Creek Watershed on the northwest side of Bear Creek Ridge. Peavine Ridge sits in the distance in Rockefeller Forest, the world’s largest continuous old-growth redwood forest, measuring more than 10,000 acres.

Photo by Michael Nichols.  Click pic to see more photos in this series.


The Bamboo Forest by Trey Ratcliffe of Stuck in Customs

The Bamboo Forest by Trey Ratcliffe of Stuck in Customs

Source Flickr / stuckincustoms



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